Vortrag

Subtitle
Identité, langue et culture chez les jeunes de la deuxième génération de migration congolaise en Belgique
Summary

MuseumTalks

Priscilla Kasongo Dioso

The experience of migration can cause identity and/or language disturbances. In order to manage these disturbances, migrants can be led to develop strategies. These strategies were at the heart of Priscilla Kasongo's doctoral research, carried out at the Catholic University of Louvain between 2014 and 2020.

During her thesis, she analysed the language practices of young people of the second generation of Congolese migration (D.R. Congo) in Belgium, in order to identify the identity strategies they put in place, and to establish the profiles corresponding to these strategies.

During this communication, Priscilla Kasongo will present her research results, in particular the intercultural identity construction schema that she has constructed, a schema in which the Belgian-Congolese identity is central and broken down into several sub-profiles (radical or multicultural, convergent or divergent).

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About the speaker

Recently graduated from the Catholic University of Louvain, Dr Priscilla Kasongo Dioso is mainly interested in intercultural issues related to the Congolese diasporas (D.R. Congo) in the world, more particularly in their identity, language and sociolinguistic aspects.

Her publications at Éditions L'Harmattan and Éditions Universitaires Européennes bear witness to this. In addition, her documentary, produced in collaboration with the non-profit organisation Be Pax, explores the theme of the transnational activities of the Belgian-Congolese:

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for an exciting talk about one particular aspect of the permanent exhibition! Take a look behind the scenes of the AfricaMuseum and discover the work of its scientists and its collaboration with African artists.

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Tarif

Free, but registration is required.

Summary

MuseumTalks

An encounter with artist Hadassa Ngamba, in residence at the HISK Ghent

Hadassa Ngamba is interested in the cartographic arrangements of former African colonial territories, particularly the DRC, and the way in which these spaces have been submerged and confiscated by imperial and capitalist systems.

In particular, she attacks the indicators of capitalism and, through her work, she challenges the signals of a system that she considers to be failing and unbalanced.

Her current work analyses and investigates the cartographies of Katanga and Kongo Central.

Hadassa Ngamba completed a residency at the AfricaMuseum in January 2020. There she conducted research in the departments of geology and history.

During this MuseumTalk, she will address the theme of Congolese cartography and access to archives. 

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Cerveau3

 

About the artist

Hadassa Ngamba was born in 1993 in Kizu, in the province of Kongo Central in the DRC. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Criminology from the University of Lubumbashi and lives and works in Katanga and Central Kongo. She is currently a postgraduate candidate and resident at the HISK (Hoger Instituut voor Schone Kunsten - Higher Institute of Fine Arts) in Ghent.

Hadassa Ngamba is a visual artist. She participated in the 5th and 6th Lubumbashi Biennial. In 2019, she carried out a residency at WIELS. She also received the Moonens Foundation prize, which enabled her to carry out field research in the province of Kongo Central in 2019.

Her work consists of paintings, drawings, photographs, videos, installations and performances. She is interested in economic indicators and the monitoring of strategic spaces in the DRC in relation to the exploitation of mining and land resources. Her work is based on cartography, hence her interest in the museum and its archives. In her paintings and drawings - often large formats - she creates a mental cartography with an emphasis on distortions and shortcomings. She often uses mineral materials as pigments, particularly malachite from Katanga.

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for an exciting talk about one particular aspect of the permanent exhibition! Take a look behind the scenes of the AfricaMuseum and discover the work of its scientists and its collaboration with African artists.

> All MuseumTalks

 

Place

Auditorium of the AfricaMuseum, entrance via the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Tarif

Free, but registration is required.

Info

Don't forget your mask!

Subtitle
Online conference
Summary

MuseumTalks

Jean Omasombo Tshonda

On 30 June 1960, King Baudouin and Patrice Lumumba each defended their views on colonisation. Their speeches expose diametrically opposed visions and constitute the dominant image of the decolonisation of the Belgian Congo.

On 30 June 2020, on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the independence of the Democratic Republic of Congo, the AfricaMuseum is organising a MuseumTalk with Jean Omasombo Tshonda, author of the book La décolonisation du Congo belge: la gestion politique des 24 derniers mois avant l'indépendance. This book traces the political management from July 1958 to June 1960. During this conference, the author addresses the global context of independence as well as the role of Patrice Lumumba.

 

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About the speaker

Jean Omasombo Tshonda is a researcher in the History and Politics Department of the Royal Museum for Central Africa and a professor at the University of Kinshasa.

 

Jean Omasombo Tshonda about Patrice Lumumba's speech:

 

King Baudouin's speech (full version):

 

Joseph Kasa-Vubu's speech (full version):

 

Patrice Lumumba's speech (full version):

 

With the technical support of Storycatchers.

 

Place

Online conference

Tarif

Free

Summary

MuseumTalks

Aimé Mpane & Aimé Ntakiyica

Aimé Ntakiyica and Aimé Mpane, two internationally renowned artists, share a common interest in the museum and the questions it raises: identity, society, decolonisation. During this MuseumTalk, they will meet and discuss their works exhibited at the museum and their artistic approaches in connection with the renovation of the AfricaMuseum.

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About the works

  • Une affaire de famille. L’arbre généalogique (Family business. The family tree)
    Aimé Ntakiyica
    Set of jam jars, all of the same size and filled with bits of coloured wool. Each jar is labelled with the name of a member of the artist's family. This work thus enriches the museum's collection with 180 names, which - as the artist reminds us - is not negligible for a museum with such a large number of unnamed objects.
     
  • Nouveau souffle ou le Congo bourgeonnant (New Breath or the Burgeoning Congo)
    Aimé Mpane
    Placed in the large rotunda of the museum, this monumental work offers a formal response to the statues of colonial propaganda. It represents a carved head in wood, the artist's favourite material, of which he praises its natural and lively side. This head is traversed by a metal that spills on the ground and buds at the top. The work represents a Congo of hope, resolutely turned towards the future.

 

About the artists

Born in Burundi in 1960, Aimé Ntakiyica lives and works in Belgium. He uses concepts of ubiquity, overlapping different spaces, both literally and metaphorically. In particular, and not without humour, he plays with the absurdity of the notion of identity. His works and the media adapt to situations: paintings, photos, interactive installations, etc.​​​

Born in Kinshasa in 1968, Aimé Mpane lives between Brussels and his native city. He experiments with encounters between paintings and multidisciplinary installations, developing original processes that combine traditional know-how and contemporary knowledge. His works combine the raw side of the so-called ‘primitive’ arts with a political commitment that denounces the light and shadow sides of our human condition.

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for an exciting talk about one particular aspect of the permanent exhibition! Take a look behind the scenes of the AfricaMuseum and discover the work of its scientists and its collaboration with African artists.

> All MuseumTalks

 

Place

Auditorium, on level -1 of the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Tarif

Free, but registration is required

Summary

MuseumTalks

Wannes Hubau

Intact tropical forests captured 15% of our carbon dioxide emissions over the early 2000s, storing it in wood and other forms of biomass. However, the capacity of Amazonian forests to capture excess carbon from the atmosphere is waning. In this MuseumTalk, we learn how the African tropical forest ‘carbon sink’ is evolving and whether we have pushed ‘The Lungs of our Planet’ to their very limits.

 

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About the speaker

Wannes Hubau explores tropical African vegetation responses to climate change at several timescales. He obtained his PhD at Ghent University in 2013 and conducted post-doctoral research at Leeds University, the Wood Biology Service of the AfricaMuseum and Ghent University. He led numerous field expeditions in four African countries (Liberia, Ghana, Cameroon, DR Congo).

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for an exciting talk about one particular aspect of the permanent exhibition! Take a look behind the scenes of the AfricaMuseum and discover the work of its scientists and its collaboration with African artists.

> All MuseumTalks

 

Place

Foyer, on level -1 of the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Tarif

Free, just drop in

Subtitle
Tools, approaches and perspectives
Summary

Slope processes and the hazards they pose affect landscapes and societies at variable spatial and temporal scales. Their study relies on the combination of various tools and approaches. Remote sensing - space-borne, aerial or field-based – often plays a major role. When it comes to studying these processes in challenging environments (i.e., remote, steep topography, context of data-scarcity, etc.), common research strategies need to be questioned.

Combining expert talks and a poster session, this workshop aims at offering an opportunity to foster exchanges of ideas and experiences among experts, students and young researchers (PhD and postdocs) regarding the study of slope processes in challenging environments.   

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Programme

 

Science Talks   (13.30 – 15.00)

  • Georgina Bennett [University of Exeter]
    Investigation of earth-surface dynamics and hazards in mountainous region
  • Thom Bogaard  [TU Delft]
    Hillslope and landslide hydrology
  • Pablo Gonzalez [University of Liverpool]
    Constraining volcano flank dynamics using space geodesy
  • Dalia Kirschbaum [NASA]
    Satellite precipitation estimates for landslide monitoring
  • Jean-Philippe Malet [University of Strasbourg]
    Landslide inventories from satellite imagery: usefulness for hazard assessment
  • Martin Rutzinger [Austrian Academy of Sciences]
    Ground-based measures of changing alpine environments

 

Poster session  (15.00 – 16.30)

Young researchers are encouraged to present their research as a poster. We welcome contributions investigating slope processes such as e.g., landslides, erosion, sediment dynamics, etc. Special interest goes to research taking advantage of remote sensing approaches and products.

 

Registration

Registration is free of charge but mandatory for all participants. Deadline for registration is 20 February 2020.

> Info and reservation

 

 

Place

Meeting Room 1, on level -1 of the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Summary

Tamires de Oliveira and Milton de Paula are two Brazilian researchers who have been invited to participate in the BiosphereCarbon project of the Royal Museum for Central Africa.

Tamires de Oliveira has worked on river turtles and floodplain ecology in the Amazon and will present her thesis work.

Milton de Paula is a PhD candidate who is researching the impact of human environmental disturbances on Amazonian game animals and will present his PhD research.

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  • Tamires de Oliveira:
    The influence of floodplain dynamics on ecology of Amazonian turtles 
     
  • Milton de Paula:
    Synergistic effects of primary forest conversion and hunting on Amazonian game vertebrates along a large-scale urban-rural-wildland gradient of human disturbance.
Place

Room 333 of the CAPA building (building E on the map)

Tarif

Free

Summary

Dr. Jesús Aguirre Gutiérrez

Dr. Gutiérrez is a postdoc researcher at the Environmental Change Institute of the University of Oxford, where he is involved with the Ecosystems research group. His research focuses on understanding the impact of environmental condition on the distribution of species at a local and a global level over time. At the Ecosystems Lab he investigates the relationship between plant functional trait diversity, climate, LiDAR derived vegetation structure, and the plants’ spectal reflectance obtained from remote sensing data. 

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The issues of tropical forest stocks, sinks and sources are a central topic in international policy debates on climate changes. UNESCO Biosphere Reserves are living laboratories for research on climate changes. The BiosphereCarbon seminars aim at underpinning carbon focused research in tropical rainforests.

 

Place

Meeting Room 1, on level -1 of the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Tarif

Free

Summary

Dr. Aida Cuní Sanchez

Dr. Cuní Sanchez is a research associate at the University of York at the Department of Environment & Geography and at Colorado State University at the Department of Ecosystem Science & Sustainability. She has done a lot of fieldwork in various Biosphere Reserves in Africa, focusing on research in tropical forest ecology, carbon stocks, ethnobotany, forest conservation and forest use by local communities. Her research combines natural and social sciences: currently she works on a project that assesses ecosystem services, threats and potential management strategies for African montane forests.

""

The issues of tropical forest stocks, sinks and sources are a central topic in international policy debates on climate changes. UNESCO Biosphere Reserves are living laboratories for research on climate changes. The BiosphereCarbon seminars aim at underpinning carbon focused research in tropical rainforests.

 

Place

CAPA building (building E on the map)

Tarif

Free

Summary

MuseumTalks

Tine Huyse

Parasites are unwanted passengers of people and animals. By traveling with their host to new areas, they can cause new epidemics. A striking example of this is the tropical disease bilharzia, which was introduced in South America by the transatlantic slave trade.

Increasing globalisation and human interventions in nature, such as the construction of reservoirs or irrigation channels, are also creating new breeding grounds for mosquitoes, snails and other disease vectors.

A state of affairs and possible solutions.

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About the speaker

Tine Huyse is a senior researcher at the Biology Department of the Royal Museum for Central Africa. Previously, she worked at the KU Leuven, the Institute of Tropical Medicine and the Natural History Museum in London. 

She studies the emergence and spread of infectious diseases such as bilharzia and fasciolosis in Africa, which affect millions of people and animals worldwide.

 

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for an exciting talk about one particular aspect of the permanent exhibition! Take a look behind the scenes of the AfricaMuseum and discover the work of its scientists and its collaboration with African artists.

> All MuseumTalks

 

Place

Meeting Room 1, on level -1 of the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Tarif

Free, just drop in