Vortrag

Subtitle
Followed by a discussion
Hour info
3 pm
Sprache
in French (the film has English subtitles)
Available
On
Summary

With Francis Dujardin & Georgine Dibua

As part of the exhibition 'Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions', the AfricaMuseum organises on Saturday 19 February 2022 at 3 pm a screening of the documentary 'Boma-Tervuren, le voyage' (54 min., 1999, French version with English subtitles), directed by Francis Dujardin.

After the screening, you will have the opportunity to ask questions to the director and Georgine Dibua, coordinator of Bakushinta.

""

The extraordinary and tragic story of 267 Congolese brought to the Brussels World's Fair in 1897, a four-month journey to Belgium to be exhibited before a million visitors. The crushing gaze of the "Whites" and the cold; for many, disease and death for some... The dead, hastily thrown into a mass grave, triggered a huge controversy in Belgian society. A disproportionate but necessary project in the eyes of the first colonisers who claimed to domesticate the distant savages... One hundred years later, Congolese compatriots return to the place of memory and question the "Whites" of today about the incredible history of this "human zoo". They perform the ritual of "returning to the land" as a way of repairing a wound that is too deep... The film revives a century of stereotypical perceptions of Africans. The question is almost haunting: "What has changed today?".


As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

Place

Auditorium of the AfricaMuseum, entrance via the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Dauer
2 hours
Tarif

- Film only : free
- Film + visit of the expo Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhitions: 4€ (instead of 10€)

Info

Registration is mandatory.
A Covid Safe Ticket will be required and a mask must be worn.

Hour info
7:30 p.m.
Sprache
In French
Available
On
Summary

Nanette Snoep, Gillian Mathys & Anne Wetsi Mpoma

Moderator: David Van Reybrouck

""

Until 6 March 2022, the AfricaMuseum is hosting the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions. Several European countries are conducting a debate on colonisation and decolonisation. In response to the Black Lives Matter protests, Belgium set up a Parliamentary Commission 'colonial past' in 2020, also known as the 'Congo Commission'. A year later, a group of ten experts published a first report.

What are the most important conclusions of the experts' report? How can former colonial powers develop a reparations policy? What role should African countries and the diaspora play in the search for historical truths and reparations?

On Wednesday 19 January 2022, writer David Van Reybrouck (Congo. Een geschiedenis) holds a discussion with Nanette Snoep (director of the Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum in Germany), historian Gillian Mathys (Ghent University) and art historian Anne Wetsi Mpoma (Wetsi Art Gallery). Mathys and Wetsi are members of the expert group of the Parliamentary Commission in Belgium.


As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

Dauer
About 1.5 hours
Tarif

Free but registration is mandatory.

Subtitle
2 March 2022 - 7.30 p.m.
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Available
On

 

 

 

 

Only available in French.

 

Subtitle
9 March 2022 - 7.30 p.m.
slideshow_agenda_thumbnail
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Available
On
Hour info
7:30 p.m.
Sprache
In Dutch
Available
On
Summary

Amade M'charek & Jana Kerremans

Until 6 March 2022, the AfricaMuseum is hosting the exhibition 'Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions'. The exhibition focuses on 'racial theories' from the past. This MuseumTalk addresses the following questions: what do genetics say about 'race'? How do researchers look at the natural diversity between people? And what can science mean today in the fight against racism?

On Wednesday 26 January 2022 at 7.30 pm, presenter Jana Kerremans will talk to Amade M'charek, professor of anthropology of science at the University of Amsterdam. M'charek studies the relationship between science and society with a special focus on genetics.

""

As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

Dauer
About 1 hour
Tarif

Free, but registration is mandatory

Hour info
7:30 p.m.
Sprache
In French
Available
On
Summary

Maarten Couttenier, Georgine Dibua, Kalvin Soiresse

Moderator: Baudouin Mena Sebu

""

Until 6 March 2022, the AfricaMuseum hosts the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions. During the Belgian colonial period, millions of Congolese were victims of violence. In Belgium, Congolese were exhibited in human zoos. At least fourteen of these Congolese died in Antwerp (1894) and Tervuren (1897).

On Wednesday 12 January 2022 at 7.30 p.m., doctoral student Baudouin Mena Sebu (University of Antwerp) will enter into discussion with historian Maarten Couttenier (AfricaMuseum, Congo tentoongesteld), Georgine Dibua (Bakushinta) and Brussels MP Kalvin Soiresse (Ecolo).

The following questions are central: what do we know today about the (fatal) victims of colonisation? How do governments and museums play a role in the commemoration? What initiatives are the African diaspora taking?


As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

Dauer
About 1.5 hours
Tarif

Free but registration is mandatory.

Hour info
7:30 p.m.
Sprache
in Dutch
Available
On
Summary

Omar Ba, Amina Odofin, Amir Bachrouri - Naima Charkaoui

Moderator: Salomé Ysebaert

""

Until 6 March 2022, the AfricaMuseum is hosting the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions. The exhibition pays special attention to the link between colonialism and racism. The display of Africans in human zoos was a racist phenomenon that also took place in various Belgian cities. But what about contemporary racism in Belgium? Why is a political action plan against racism important? And how can citizens support the anti-racism movement?

On Wednesday 2 February 2022, the museum organises a discussion with diversity consultant Omar Ba, European project officer Amina Odofin (LEVL) and law student Amir Bachrouri (president of the Flemish Youth Council). The evening starts with an introduction by author Naima Charkaoui about racism, wounds and resilience. Moderator is Salomé Ysebaert (AfricaMuseum).

On Saturday 29 January 2022 Naima Charkaoui will be signing her book 'Racisme: over wonden en veerkracht'/'Racisme: une histoire de blessures et de résilience' in the museum.


As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

Dauer
About 2 hours
Tarif

Free but registration is mandatory.

Hour info
12.30 - 13.30
Sprache
In French
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks

Daniela Waldburger

In 2003, mineworkers of the Gécamines (former Union Minière du Haut-Katanga (UMHK)), a mining company in Lubumbashi (DR Congo), lost their job after a deal between the Congolese government and the World Bank to liberalise the mining sector.

This talk focuses on a research project among and with the Collectif des ex-agents de la Gécamines (“Départs Volontaires”), these ex-workers of the Union Minière du Haut-Katanga/Gécamines in Lubumbashi (DR Congo).

""

Exhibition Centre d‘Art Waza, Lubumbashi, July 2019
©COLBY
photo © Daniela Waldburger

Their (work)life is characterized by the experience of a severe economic decline that feeds an immense nostalgia. “C’était bien à l’époque!” is an often heard sentence and it serves as a starting point to talk about:

  • linguistic strategies to cope with the loss of income that radically changed ex-workers’ perceptions of life and 
  • their master narrative as a strategy of their fight for compensation after they lost their employment in 2003.

How did the project’s idea come about? Which research questions and methods accompanied the project? What can we learn from this research project? And why is this project important also regarding the relationship between Belgium and the DRC?

 

About the speaker

Daniela Waldburger is Senior Lecturer (Swahili, Linguistics) at the Department of African Studies at the University of Vienna. From 2017- 2020 she was also a post-doctoral researcher in a project funded by the Austrian Science Fund. Her current book project bases on the data from this project related research stays in Lubumbashi (DR Congo) and focuses on the nostalgia of the ex-mineworkers.

Her other research foci include sociolinguistics, discourse analysis and generally questions on language and power (mis)use, Swahili language and literatures, Swahili varieties and approaches of more including research methods.

 


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Place

Online

Tarif

Free, but registration is mandatory

Hour info
7:30 p.m.
Sprache
In French
Available
On
Summary

Teddy Mazina & Roméo Mivekannin

Moderator: Ayoko Mensah

From 9 November 2021 to 6 March 2022, the AfricaMuseum presents the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions. Two artists have made important contributions to the exhibition. On Wednesday 16 February 2022 at 7.30 pm Ayoko Mensah, artistic programmer at the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, will talk with Teddy Mazina and Roméo Mivekannin.

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Muzungu Tribes by Burundian photojournalist Teddy Mazina is an exploratory mission using photography, a reflection on colonial iconography and its codes, classifications, and rankings of people and bodies. Muzungu Tribes takes shape in a laboratory where the artist seeks to invert our perspectives, to question colonial imagery and the racist stereotypes it has produced.

Roméo Mivekannin lives and works between France and Benin. For the exhibition, the artist uses a painting to revisit a photograph taken in 1930 and which shows Congolese soldiers paying homage to the seven men, also Congolese, brought to Belgium to be presented in a human zoo during the 1897 international exhibition. With his work Homage aux 7, Mivekannin interrogates the observation and classification tools that are, respectively, the human zoo and photography as a medium.


As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

Place

Online

Dauer
About 1.5 hours
Tarif

Free, but registration is required.

Subtitle
Film screening followed by a discussion
Hour info
3.00 p.m.
Sprache
In French
Available
On
Summary

With Bruno-Victor Pujebet, Abd Al Malik & Monique Mbeka Phoba

Moderator: Gia Abrassart

POSTPONED

Due to the sanitary situation, the museum has decided to postpone the film screening. People who have registered can still visit the exhibition.

On the occasion of the exhibition Human zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions the AfricaMuseum organises on Saturday 11 December at 3 pm the screening of the film Sauvages. Au coeur des zoos humains (2018), directed by Pascal Blanchard and Bruno-Victor Pujebet and narrated by Abd Al Malik. 

After the screening, journalist Gia Abrassart (Café Congo) will talk to co-director Bruno-Victor Pujebet, artist Abd Al Malik and filmmaker Monique Mbeka Phoba.

For more than a century, from 1810 to 1940, people exhibited other people by presenting them as savages or monsters in real human zoos. More than one and a half billion visitors discovered thirty-five thousand exhibits around the world. History had forgotten their names. They are called Petite Capeline, a Fuegian from Patagonia (Chile), Tambo, an Australian aborigine, Moliko, a Kalina from Guyana, Ota Benga from Congo, Jean Thiam, a Wolof from Senegal, Marius Kaloïe, a Kanak from New Caledonia... Sauvages, au coeur des zoos humains retraces the destinies of six of them with the help of the greatest international specialists, based on exceptional archives and images, and by collecting the unpublished testimonies of their descendants.

""

As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

Place

Auditorium of the AfricaMuseum, entrance via the Welcome Pavilion (building A on the map)

Dauer
About 2.5 hours
Tarif

- Film only : free
- Film + visit of the expo Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhitions: 4€ (instead of 10€)

Info

Registration is mandatory.
A Covid Safe Ticket will be required and a mask must be worn.