Lecture

Subtitle
Laboratoire vivant de recherche sur les écosystèmes forestiers
Hour info
12.30 - 13.30
Language
In French (slides in English)
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks

Bhely Angoboy Ilondea

A relic of the Mayombe forest, the Luki Biosphere Reserve is home to an important natural heritage. Since 1937, experiments have been carried out on tropical forestry, forest management, forest ecology, climatology, monitoring of tree growth and phenology, the behaviour of tree species and the enrichment of savannahs with forest species. Most of these experiments are still visible in the field and have acquired great scientific value because they have lasted for a long time. They are currently used as a reference for studies on the forests of the Congo Basin in the context of climate change. 

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About the speaker

Bhely Angoboy Ilondea is a researcher at the Institut National pour l'Etude et la Recherche Agronomiques (INERA) in the Democratic Republic of Congo. He has been working for more than 10 years in the Luki Biosphere Reserve where he is interested in forest dynamics and the resilience of tropical forests in the Congo Basin in response to climate change. He recently defended his PhD thesis entitled Phenology and growth traits governing forest dynamics of tropical tree species communities: experimental data based on the Luki Man and Biosphere Reserve, DRCongo at Ghent University.

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for exciting talks with experts, scientists and artists!

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Place

Online

Price

Free, but registration is mandatory

Info

As the event will be held in French, the registration form is in French only. We thank you for your understanding.

Hour info
19.30
Language
In Dutch
Available
On
Summary

Aspha Bijnaar & Jana Kerremans

 

From 9 November 2021 to 6 March 2022, the AfricaMuseum presents the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions. The exhibition is an opportunity for the museum and FARO, the Flemish support centre for cultural heritage, to have a conversation about how to deal with a painful past. Why is it important to pay attention to colonial history? How can historical knowledge reach a new and young audience?

On Wednesday 24 November at 7.30 p.m., culture and heritage expert Jana Kerremans will talk to the Surinamese-Dutch sociologist Aspha Bijnaar. Since 2006 she is founder and director of EducatieStudio, specialised in making colonial history accessible. Since 2021, Dr. Bijnaar has also been the director of the foundation Musea Bekennen Kleur. This organisation investigates which steps museums can take to promote diversity and inclusion in the museum world.

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As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

 

With the technical support of Stream Media.

 

Place

Online

Duration
1h
Price

Free

Hour info
7:30 p.m.
Language
French
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks Expo

 

Mireille-Tsheusi Robert, Delphine Peiretti-Courtis & Sylvie Chalaye

Moderator: Marie-Reine Iyumva

The exhibition Human zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions also presents images of black men, women, and children. Three speakers take a critical look at the representation of black bodies in human zoos. Has the colonial view of black people become outdated, or does it persist to this day? Can historical images be used as a teaching tool in fighting racist stereotypes?

Marie-Reine Iyumva (AfricaMuseum) will moderate a debate with educator Mireille-Tsheusi Robert (Bamko asbl), historian Delphine Peiretti-Courtis (Université d’Aix Marseille), and anthropologist Sylvie Chalaye (Université de la Sorbonne).

As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

 

Place

online

Duration
1h30
Price

free

Hour info
7:30 p.m.
Language
in Dutch and French
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks Expo

 

Guido Gryseels, Pascal Blanchard, Maarten Couttenier, Mathieu Zana Etambala, Teddy Mazina, Salomé Ysebaert & Marie-Reine Iyumva

Moderator: Katrien Vanderschoot

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Did you know that 125 years ago, Congolese individuals were put on display in Tervuren’s Warande park? The new temporary exhibition highlights the phenomenon of persons presented as living exhibits. Did this involve Black individuals only? What impact did human zoos have on our current view? Why is the AfricaMuseum presenting this exhibit?

Katrien Vanderschoot (VRT journalist) holds a discussion with Guido Gryseels (AfricaMuseum director), curators and historians Pascal Blanchard (Groupe de recherche Achac), Maarten Couttenier and Mathieu Zana Etambala (AfricaMuseum), artist Teddy Mazina and exhibition team members Salomé Ysebaert and Marie-Reine Iyumva (AfricaMuseum).  


As part of the exhibition Human Zoo. The age of colonial exhibitions, the AfricaMuseum presents a series of discussions on the exhibition, (de)colonisation and (anti)racism.

> Programme of the MuseumTalks

 

Place

online

Duration
1h
Price

free

Subtitle
Book presentation with Ludo De Witte
Hour info
12.30 - 13.30
Language
In French
Available
On
Summary

Sixty years ago, on 13 October 1961, Prince Louis Rwagasore, who had just been elected Prime Minister of Burundi, was assassinated while dining in a restaurant. At the time, Burundi was a territory under Belgian rule. In his book Meurtre au Burundi, Ludo De Witte examines this assassination and the role played by the Belgian administration in Burundi, the Belgian government and King Baudouin.

 

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About the speaker

Ludo De Witte is a sociologist and author of several books, including De moord op Lumumba.

 

This MuseumTalk will be hosted by Burundian photojournalist Teddy Mazina.

 

Place

Online

Price

Free, but registration is mandatory

Hour info
12.30 - 14.00
Language
In French
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks

Provenance research is one of the museum's priorities. Its aim is to study the circumstances in which the collections were acquired, mainly during the colonial period.

In the framework of a scientific residency, Prof. Placide Mumbembele Sanger (University of Kinshasa) is studying the provenance of Yaka masks kept in the AfricaMuseum.

 

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Programme:

  • Welcome by Guido Gryseels, Director General of the AfricaMuseum (5')
  • Introduction by Thomas Dermine, Secretary of State for Recovery and Strategic Investments, in charge of Science Policy, on his approach regarding the restitution of objects in the context of the colonial past between the Belgian State and the Democratic Republic of Congo (15')
  • Lecture by Prof. Placide Mumbembele Sanger, University of Kinshasa: Recherche de provenance : quels enjeux pour les collections ethnographiques de l'AfricaMuseum acquises durant la période coloniale (40')
  • Questions from the audience (20')

 

About the speaker

Placide Mumbembele Sanger holds a PhD in Political and Social Sciences from the Université libre de Bruxelles where he defended a PhD thesis in 2015 entitled, Les musées, témoins de la politique culturelle, de l'époque coloniale à nos jours, en République démocratique du Congo. He currently teaches the history of museums in Congo at the University of Kinshasa. His research deals with the issue of museums and cultural heritage in the African (post)colonial context. His current interest is in the issue of restitution of cultural property between Belgium and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Place

Online

Price

Free but registration is mandatory

Subtitle
L’Église kimbanguiste fête son centenaire
Hour info
12.30 - 13.30
Language
In French
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks

Mathieu Zana Etambala

 

In 1921, Simon Kimbangu found his vocation and began to preach on the fate of the Lower Congo. He protested against colonisation and founded a religious movement that quickly gained thousands of followers. Arrested by the colonial administration, Kimbangu died in prison in Elisabethville (Lubumbashi) in 1951. Today, the Kimbanguist Church is a major religious movement and Nkamba, Kimbangu's birthplace, is considered the new Jerusalem.

On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Kimbanguist Church, Mathieu Zana Etambala talks about the life of Simon Kimbangu and the impact of Kimbanguism today.

 

About the speaker

Until his retirement in 2020, Mathieu Zana Etambala was a historian at the Royal Museum for Central Africa and a professor at the KU Leuven, where he taught African and colonial history. He is a member of the group of experts assisting the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Since February 2021, he is professor of African history at Ghent University.

picture of simon kimbangu

Portrait of Simon Kimbangu. CP.2011.1.1, collection RMCA Tervuren All rights reserved

Place

Online.

Price

Free but registration is required.

Subtitle
A century of Congolese Art in Antwerp
Hour info
12.30 - 13.30
Language
In Dutch
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks

Els De Palmenaer & Nadia Nsayi

One hundred years ago, during the colonial era, Congolese art and utensils came into the possession of the city of Antwerp for the first time. These objects are now part of the collection of MAS | Museum aan de stroom.

Following this project, curator Els De Palmenaer and co-curator Nadia Nsayi will give an insight into the creation of this temporary exhibition, which focuses on 100 objects. What can the visitor expect? And how did the MAS collaborate for this project in Belgium and in Congo?

 

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About the speakers

  • Els De Palmenaer is curator of the African collection at the MAS. After specialising in art history and antiquities with a focus on Africa, she worked as a researcher in the ethnography section of the Royal Museum for Central Africa in the 1990s. In 2000, she moved to the Antwerp Ethnographic Museum, where she was appointed Africa curator. In 2009, the former Ethnographic Museum was integrated into the MAS, which opened to the public in 2011. She is curator of the temporary exhibition '100xCongo' and editor of the accompanying catalogue.
     
  • Nadia Nsayi is a Belgian-Congolese political scientist. She worked as a policy officer Congo at Broederlijk Delen and Pax Christi. Since 2019 she has been a curator of image at the MAS. In 2020 she released her book Dochter van de dekolonisatie.

Photo: Dries Luyten


The exhibition 100 x Congo can still be seen at the MAS in Antwerp until 12.09.2021.

> More info about the exhibition

Exhibit catalogue:

100 x Congo. Een eeuw Congolese kunst in Antwerpen

Order the book in Dutch or in French.

 

The AfricaMuseum has contributed to this temporary MAS exhibition by exceptionally lending two objects from its permanent display from October 2020 to March 2021, as well as co-financing the French translation of the Dutch accompanying book.

Place

Online

Price

Free, but registration is required.

Subtitle
A history in documents from the Henry Morton Stanley archives
Hour info
12.30 - 13.30
Language
In English
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks

Mathilde Leduc-Grimaldi

In this MuseumTalk, Mathilde Leduc-Grimaldi presents her and James L. Newman’s latest book Finding Dr. Livingstone. A History in Documents from the Henry Morton Stanley Archives.

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This eye-opening perspective on Stanley’s expedition reveals new details about the Victorian traveler and his African crew on the brink of the colonial Scramble for Africa.

In 1871, Welsh journalist Henry M. Stanley travelled to Zanzibar in search of the “missing” Scottish doctor and missionary David Livingstone. A year later, Stanley emerged to announce that he had “found” and met with Livingstone on Lake Tanganyika. His alleged utterance there, “Dr. Livingstone, I presume,” was one of the most famous phrases of the nineteenth century, and Stanley’s book, How I Found Livingstone, became an international bestseller.

In this volume Mathilde Leduc-Grimaldi and James L. Newman transcribed and annotated the entirety of Stanley’s documentation available in the Stanley Archives held in trust at the RMCA on behalf of the King Baudouin Foundation. For the first time in print, a broader narrative of Stanley’s journey is now accessible that includes never-before-seen primary source documents—worker contracts, vernacular plant names, maps, ruminations on life, correspondence, lines of poetry, bills of lading—all scribbled in his field notebooks.

Finding Dr. Livingstone is a crucial resource for those interested in exploration and colonization in the Victorian era, the scientific knowledge of the time, and the peoples and conditions of Tanzania prior to its colonization by Germany.

About the speaker

Mathilde Leduc-Grimaldi is curator of the Henry M. Stanley Archives and Collections at the Royal Museum for Central Africa. With Pr. James L. Newman, she edited Adventures of an American Traveller in Turkey, by Henry Morton Stanley. Her past exhibitions include Dr Livingstone, I presume? (2013). She is in charge of archives and history training programs for graduate students, archivists, and librarians from Central Africa.

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for an exciting talk about one particular aspect of the permanent exhibition! Take a look behind the scenes of the AfricaMuseum and discover the work of its scientists and its collaboration with African artists.

> All MuseumTalks

 

Place

Online

Hour info
12.30 - 13.30
Language
Film in French with English subtitles, discussion in French.
Available
On
Summary

MuseumTalks

The film Through the Eyes presents two musical practices from oral traditions: the Elombo ceremony in Gabon and the Carnaval de Binche in Belgium.

The film takes the same approach to these two rituals practiced on different continents. In doing so, it aims to address the question of the representation of culture through music, highlighting the differences and above all the similarities that exist between these two traditions.

The screening of the film Through the Eyes is followed by a discussion in the presence of the directors and members of the RIETMA project, the project within which the film was made.

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The film Through the Eyes is a product of the RIETMA projectRéseau international d’Étude des Tradition musicales africaines (International Network for the Study of African Musical Traditions). The aim of the project was to bring together the views of Africanologists and cultural professionals, Africans and Europeans, in order to compare musical representations from oral traditions. The objective was to propose a model of representation of traditions that is not only descriptive but also inclusive in order to prevent any form of exoticism or cultural reduction.

Members of the project :

  • Rémy Jadinon - Royal Museum for Central Africa, Tervuren (Belgium)
  • Arnold Aganze, Derek Debru - Nyege Nyege Festival, Jinja (Uganda)
  • Stéphane Colin, Matthieu Thonon, Saskia Willaert - Musical Instruments Museum, Brussels (Belgium)
  • Camille Devineau, Sylvie Le Bomin - Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris (France)
  • Susanne Fürniss - CNRS - Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris (France)
  • Eveline Koho Kabou - Musée de la Musique, Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)
  • Larissa Nzang Metogo - Musée national du Gabon, Libreville (Gabon)

The RIETMA project is funded by the Belgian Science Policy.

 


MuseumTalks

Join us each month for an exciting talk about one particular aspect of the permanent exhibition! Take a look behind the scenes of the AfricaMuseum and discover the work of its scientists and its collaboration with African artists.

> All MuseumTalks

 

Place

Online

Price

Free but registration is compulsory.

Info

Duration of the film: 38 min.